outlive

outlive, outlast, survive are comparable when they mean to remain in existence longer than another person or thing or after a given experience.
Outlive carries a strong implication of a capacity for endurance and is especially appropriate when competition, struggle, or the surmounting of a difficulty is also connoted
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not marble, nor the gilded monuments of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme— Shak.

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the world has outlived much, and will outlive a great deal more— J. R. Lowell

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Outlast differs little from outlive but usually stresses greater length of duration rather than greater capacity for endurance and therefore may be employed when comparison is more important than a suggestion of superiority or when the fact of existing longer is more important than the length of time involved
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customs that have long outlasted their usefulness— Inge

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the sweet sensations of returning health made me happy for a time; but such sensations seldom outlast convalescence— Hudson

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Survive may be used as an intransitive as well as a transitive verb; in general it suggests merely a living or existing longer than another person or thing, or after some event (sometimes implied rather than expressed) which might bring about his or its end
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the elder sister survived the younger

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he is unlikely to survive the operation

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one in a million of these childish talents survives puberty— Huxley

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they had at least survived the old year and were alive for the next— Irwin Shaw

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all called their host "Mr. President." That much sense of the proprieties survived the reek of whiskey— S. H. Adams

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Analogous words: endure, persist, abide, *continue: surpass, *exceed

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • Outlive — Developer(s) Continuum Entertainment Publisher(s) Continuum Entertainment (BRA) Take Two Interactive …   Wikipedia

  • Outlive — Out*live , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Outlived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Outliving}.] To live beyond, or longer than; to survive. [1913 Webster] They live too long who happiness outlive. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • outlive — index endure (last), last, remain (continue), subsist Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • outlive — (v.) to live longer than, late 15c., from OUT (Cf. out) + LIVE (Cf. live) (v.). Related: Outlived; outliving …   Etymology dictionary

  • outlive — [v] outlast continue, endure, hang on, outstay, prevail, remain, survive; concept 407 …   New thesaurus

  • outlive — ► VERB ▪ live or last longer than …   English terms dictionary

  • outlive — [out΄liv′] vt. outlived, outliving 1. to live or endure longer than 2. to live through; outlast …   English World dictionary

  • outlive — transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. to live beyond or longer than < outlived most of his friends > < outlive its usefulness > 2. to survive the effects of < universities…outlive many political and social changes J. B. Conant > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • outlive — [[t]a͟ʊtlɪ̱v[/t]] outlives, outliving, outlived VERB If one person outlives another, they are still alive after the second person has died. If one thing outlives another thing, the first thing continues to exist after the second has disappeared… …   English dictionary

  • outlive — UK [ˌaʊtˈlɪv] / US [aʊtˈlɪv] verb [transitive] Word forms outlive : present tense I/you/we/they outlive he/she/it outlives present participle outliving past tense outlived past participle outlived 1) to live longer than someone else She outlived… …   English dictionary

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